Author Archives: Adam B. Edgecombe, Esq.

My unit is flooded from a neighbor’s condo! Who pays for a condominium leak or dry-outs afterwards?

It’s not unusual for condominium owners to experience leaks that don’t come for their own unit.  Being surrounded by other people’s unit above, below, and on the sides, makes leaks inevitable from a neighbor’s condo.  When you add in owners … Read Full Post

CATEGORY: Florida Condominium Law Blog Practice Areas:

How To Ensure A Successful Condominium Annual Meeting And Board Election

As the calendar turns to fall and we approach the end of the year, it is time again for board members and managers to make sure they are prepared for their annual meetings, including board elections.  While running an effective … Read Full Post

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“Small” Claim Doesn’t Mean An Unimportant Claim

Many business owners have likely heard of small claims court, but are thankfully unfamiliar with it.  I say “thankfully” because the usual way a business owner experiences small claims court is over an outstanding account receivable, or because a disgruntled … Read Full Post

CATEGORY: Florida Business Litigation Blog Practice Areas: ,

Arbitration Guide: Understanding The Process And Its Advantages

One of the biggest legal mysteries for non-lawyers, even for experienced and sophisticated businesspeople, is the process of arbitration.  The term gets used a lot, but few actually know what the process entails, and most people are usually apprehensive about … Read Full Post

CATEGORY: Florida Business Litigation Blog Practice Areas: , ,

Litigation Privilege: It’s Practical History, Development And Application To Litigation In Florida

The litigation privilege is a broad and absolute rule, but easy to misunderstand. Therefore, review of pertinent cases in Florida can provide some clarity on when it protects certain actions. In this video presentation recorded by Adam B. Edgecombe, he … Read Full Post

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What Is A Contest Of Lien, And How Does My Association Respond To It?

You’re the President of a condominium association or an HOA.  You’ve had a problem owner for years—someone who doesn’t pay his assessments. Or when he does, payment is late and he incurs penalties and interest, and then later fights those … Read Full Post

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Commercial Evictions in Florida: What No Landlord Wants to Go Through, but What Every Landlord Needs to Know, Part 4: Tenant’s Abandoned Property

Parts one, two and three covered how landlords obtain an eviction and judgment for damages resulting from a tenant’s breach of the lease.  However, post-eviction, landlords frequently confront the problem of what to do with the personal property the tenant has left … Read Full Post

CATEGORY: Florida Commercial Real Estate And Land Use Law Blog Practice Areas:

Commercial Evictions in Florida: What No Landlord Wants to Go Through, but What Every Landlord Needs to Know, Part 3: The Complaint & Available Damages

Parts one and two of this commercial eviction blog series have looked at the process for initiating an eviction when a tenant defaults on payment of the rent or other terms of its lease, and the many statutory requirements for … Read Full Post

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Why Your Association Needs to Compel Release of Mortgage Information When a Unit Faces Foreclosure

Board members of any condominium association are no doubt familiar with the following scenario: a unit owner gets behind on his assessments and refuses to bring his balance current; the association records a lien against the unit and, when that … Read Full Post

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Commercial Evictions in Florida: What No Landlord Wants to Go Through, but What Every Landlord Needs to Know, Part 2: Filing the Complaint

Having been served with a notice of default, a tenant then has three days to cure a breach for failure to pay rent and fifteen days to cure a nonmonetary breach, unless the parties’ lease provides different timeframes. If the tenant subsequently fails to cure the breach, the landlord must then file suit for eviction. Read Full Post

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